Why the use of GetPixel and SetPixel is so inefficient!

by Miłosz Orzeł 5. April 2011 23:28

Bitmap class provides two simple methods: GetPixel and SetPixel used respectively to retrieve a point of image (as the Color structure) and set a point of image. The following code illustrates how to retrieve/set all the pixels in the bitmap:

private void GetSetPixel(Bitmap image) {
   for (int x = 0; x < image.Width; x++) {
      for (int y = 0; y < image.Height; y++) {
         Color pixel = image.GetPixel(x, y);
         image.SetPixel(x, y, Color.Black);
      }
   } 
}

As shown, review and modification of pixels is extremely simple. Unfortunately behind the simplicity of the code lies a serious performance trap. While for a small number of references to image points, the speed at which GetPixel and SetPixel work is good enough, for larger images it is not the case. Graph presented below can serve as a proof of that. It shows results of 10 tests* which consisted of 10-fold invocation of previously shown GetSetPixel method for images 100x100 and 1000x1000 pixels in size.

Wyniki testów prędkości operacji na pikselach obrazu z użyciem metod GetPixel i SetPixel klasy Bitmap.

The average test time for an image measuring 100 by 100 pixels was 543 milliseconds. This speed is acceptable if the image processing is not done frequently. Performance problem is, however, clearly visible when you try to use an image of size 1000 per 1000 pixels. Execution of the test in this case takes an average of more than 41 seconds - more than 4 sec. on a single call to GetSetPixel (seriously!).

Why so slow?

Low efficiency is due to the fact that access to the pixel is not a simple reference to a memory area. Each getting or setting of color is associated with invocation of .NET Framework method, which is a wrapper for native function contained in gdiplus.dll. This call is through the mechanism of P/Invoke (Platform Invocation), which is used to communicate from managed code to unmanaged API (API outside of the .NET Framework). So for a bitmap of 1000x1000 pixels there will be 1 million calls to GetPixel method that besides the validation of parameters uses the native GdipBitmapGetPixel function. Before returning color information, GDI+ function has to perform such operations as calculating the position of bytes responsible for description of desired pixel… Similar situation occurs in the case SetPixel method.

Look at the following code of Bitmap.GetPixel method obtained with the .NET Reflector (System.Drawing.dll, .NET Framework 2.0):

public Color GetPixel(int x, int y) {
   int argb = 0;
   if ((x < 0) || (x >= base.Width)) {
      throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException(“x”, SR.GetString(“ValidRangeX”));
   }
   if ((y < 0) || (y >= base.Height)) {
      throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException(“y”, SR.GetString(“ValidRangeY”));
   }
   
   int status = SafeNativeMethods.Gdip.GdipBitmapGetPixel(new HandleRef(this, base.nativeImage), x, y, out argb);
   if (status != 0) {
      throw SafeNativeMethods.Gdip.StatusException(status);
   }
   return Color.FromArgb(argb);
}

Here is import of GDI + function:

[DllImport(“gdiplus.dll”, CharSet=CharSet.Unicode, SetLastError=true, 
ExactSpelling=true)]
internal static extern int GdipBitmapGetPixel(HandleRef bitmap, int x, int y, out int argb);

* I have tested on such laptop: HP Pavilion dv5, AMD Turion X2 Dual-Core Mobile RM-70, 3 GB RAM, Vista Home Premium

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